One of the Best Street Trees: Buckinghamia celsissima

This is Buckinghamia celsissima or the Ivory Curl tree, it is another small to medium tree that is in flower over the summer months, chances are you have seen it around, it is VERY hard to miss. I saw this one on a street in Mosman, I think it was planted by a resident as there weren’t any others in the street, I also wondered if someone had pruned it to have such a clean trunk…?

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Buckinghamia celsissima occurs naturally in north eastern QLD, however they grow quite well on the NSW coast as long as there aren’t any frosts. In its natural rainforest habitat it will grow very tall to break through the canopy and reach the light, however the further south they are found and the colder the climate the smaller they grow, here in the Sydeny region you can expect them to be a maximum height of about 6 – 8 metres.

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The flowers are very like a Grevillea spike flower and attract the bees with their prolific nectar, the flowers are almost 30cm long and cause the branches to drop down giving the tree a weeping habit.

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When not in flower the leaves are quite stunning also, they have a beautiful bronze tinge in the new growth and the juvenile leave are deeply divided. Buckinghamia celsissima makes an excellent screening plant and also a good small shade tree, it will grow in shade but not flower particularly well. I would love to see more planted in our suburban Sydney streets.

7 thoughts on “One of the Best Street Trees: Buckinghamia celsissima

  1. These are being planted prolifically by the council in Brisbane and, like you, I feel relief when a council gets it right. We have been rewarded over this last summer with Ivory Curls in full bloom, and looking beautiful.

  2. Shirl-ann Blake on

    I love this tree , where can I buy one I live in Perth WA is it possible for me to import a small one ? And what do I do about quarantine. Any one have any ideas

  3. Nan Bailey on

    These a really beautiful trees but they can grow quite tall. I had one in my front garden in Kuranda north Queensland, not far behind the power lines, but not underneath either. I came home one day to find the electricity company had cut it down at ground level, because it was a “danger to the continued power supply during the cyclone season”. I was livid, but it was too late. The tree did regrow, and became multi trunked with a horrible shape

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